Accommodation

Accommodation

Australia has been by far amongst the top destinations for International students, with a dream to study abroad. Study in Australia is more than an educational experience; this country offers multi-cultural feel and pleasure that baffles students coming from abroad. Australian universities provide a large number of courses and employment opportunities during and after the course. Study abroad in Australia is uniquely different and helps student bloom into a confident, independent and creative thinking professional. The USP of studying in Australia is that one is assured of getting quality education as the Australian government makes sure that colleges in Australia never compromise on quality. Plus, Australia is also less expensive as compared to other countries in the world, which makes it highly demandable universities among International students. Australian Universities also provide every kind of support by means of law as well as human relations to students coming from abroad. Students want to study abroad because it will lead them to a fascinating world of adventure, new culture, new people new country. Study Abroad programs also add new dimesions to a students career with opening the dors of the world for you to work for.

Finding the right accommodation is one of the biggest challenges faced by a new international student who has came all the way to Study Abroad. To Study In Australia, finding a place in your price range can be even harder. The fact is that there is a shortage of affordable housing across Australia that affects everyone, from Australian residents to International students who come to Study Abroad. It is extremely important that you factor the high cost of housing into your budget before you come to Australia, and have access to funds that will cover possible rent increases.

You should also use the information in this book in conjunction with your own research. If your institution has an international office, contact the staff long before you arrive for information on housing options on or off campus. They might be able to provide you with links to accommodation boards on your institution’s website, or within the community. Also, keep an eye on websites like www.domain.com.au and www.realestate.com.au which list accommodation for rent. This should give you a good idea of the type of accommodation that is available to a person with your budget.
Another good tip for the students who come in Australia to Study Abroad is, to get references from people you may already have rented accommodation from at home. Providing copies of these to a real estate agent when you apply for a property can show them that you have a proven record of being a good tenant. You should also be prepared to provide them with evidence that you have enough money to pay for your accommodation, for example with a bank account statement.

Types of accommodation

There are many different types of accommodation available, so you should be able to find something that suits your needs. Most accommodation, except homestay, does not include electrical items, furniture, bedding or kitchen utensils. Cheap household goods are available from second- hand retail outlets or are advertised for private sale in newspapers or on institution noticeboards, but you may wish to bring some of your own basic items.

Your institution can provide you with advice on accommodation options. Temporary accommodation can be arranged for you before you leave home so that when you arrive you have some time to consider your long-term options.

  • Homestay
  • Hotels & Guest Houses
  • Boarding Schools
  • Campus Accommodation

If you need ATMC to arrange for Temporary or Permanent student accommodation, please email the request to ATMC at info@atmc.vic.edu.au



Getting around and enjoying Australia

Getting around and enjoying Australia

2019 Student Guide – Information about Sydney & Melbourne Public Transport

Sydney

You can explore and experience much of Sydney and surrounding regions on public transport including metro, train, bus, ferry and light rail services. In addition, there are several sightseeing buses, taxi and car hire companies to help you navigating your way around this vast city. Here are a few websites which will give you direct assistance and guidance to helping you ascend on your travels.

https://www.sydneymovingguide.com/public-transport/

https://transportnsw.info/routes/train

https://transportnsw.info/routes/bus

Melbourne

Melbourne is a hub for intercity, intracity and regional travel. Road based transport accounts for most trips across many parts of the city, facilitated by Australia’s largest freeway network. Public transport, including the world’s largest tram network, trains, buses and different cab services, also forms a key part of the transport system of Melbourne City. Here are a few websites which will give you direct assistance and guidance on helping you on where you desire to go.

https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/travel/a-guide-to-melbourne-public-transport

https://www.ptv.vic.gov.au/timetables

https://www.ptv.vic.gov.au/journey

https://yarratrams.com.au/route-guides

https://www.vline.com.au/Timetables/Train-coach-timetables



Coronavirus updates

Coronavirus updates

Advice for ATMC students about coronavirus COVID-19

This page will be updated this page as the coronavirus COVID-19 situation continues to evolve.

Please review our FAQ page for information specific to students on enrolment, inability to enter the country, health concerns, questions around deferring, internships etc. 

If you need assistance please contact us via the channels below. 

ATMC support contact and government advice >

Information for students unable to enter Australia >

Campus information, online course delivery, library services and workshop cancellation >

Your physical health and emotional wellbeing >

Information for Professional Year Students >

Employment and financial updates >

Update 5 August 2020

The Department of Home Affairs is implementing a range of visa changes to support International students.

A help sheet to support students though this process. To view the help sheet, clickhere.

To submit a valid Student visa application eligible for a nil fee, your must provide a completedForm 1545 COVID-19 Impacted Student.

To submit a valid Student visa application eligible for a nil fee, students must submit a completed Form 1545 COVID-19 Impacted Student via Student Support Servicesunder the ‘under the Course Advice and Enrolment Team categoryThis form will then be sent to the University for signature. Once the university has signed the form, this will be sent back to you for lodgement through your ImniAccount.

Students may be inside or outside of Australia when they submit their application.

Refunds are not available for students who have already applied for a student visa and only new applications from eligible students will attract a nil-VAC.

Any questions or queries regarding processing of nil-VAC student visa applications can be directed to student.visa.help.desk@homeaffairs.gov.au

More Information:
https://minister.homeaffairs.gov.au/alantudge/Pages/supporting-international-students-support-australian-jobs.aspx
https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/student-visa

 

Update 2 August 2020

 

  • A state of disaster has been declared in Victoria and Melbourne moves into stage four restrictions from 6pm tonight.
  • New restrictions for workplaces will be announced on Monday.
  • Supermarkets and basic food and beverage retailers will not be affected.
  • Melbourne will be under a curfew from 8pm to 5am every day for the next six weeks.
  • Only one person per household will be allowed to go shopping per day.
  • People cannot travel more than 5km from their house.
  • Exercise is limited to one hour a day and capped at two people.
  • Night Network will be suspended, and public transport services will be reduced during curfew hours.
  • Study at TAFE and uni must be done remotely.
  • Face coverings will continue to be compulsory

 

20 July 2020

International students enrolled with a private education provider or college in Victoria can apply for Stream Two of the International Student Emergency Relief Fund.

https://www.studymelbourne.vic.gov.au/news-updates/international-student-emergency-relief-fund/private-training-providers

 

9 July 2020

Study NSW has partnered with Foodbank NSW & ACT to provide free food hampers* to international students in NSW.
International students can access their hamper by following these steps:
1. Call Food Bank on (02) 9756 3099
2. State that you are an international student and your suburb, then ask for the distribution point closest to you
3. Have your student visa and student card with you when you collect the hamper.

8 July 2020

In line with advice from the Victorian Chief Health Officer, the Victorian Government has announced that metropolitan Melbourne and Mitchell Shire will return to Stage 3 Stay at Home restrictions from 11.59pm on Wednesday 8 July 2020.

This decision was made in response to a significant increase in community transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19) in these areas.

If you live in one of these areas, there will once again only be four reasons to leave home:

  • Shopping for food and supplies
  • Medical care and caregiving
  • Exercise and recreation
  • Study and work – if you can’t do it from home

Update 2 June 2020

Australia’s federal, state and territory governments are gradually easing restrictions around public gatherings, how businesses can operate, and regional travel. Find out more about the National Cabinet’s three-step plan to create a COVIDSafe Australia with new ways of living and working.

ATMC students will continue online learning using Microsoft Teams. Student services and support will still be available, via phone or online (see details above. Please continue to check this webpage, your email and social media regularly for further updates.

Update 29 April 2020

  • Federation University offers tuition fee reliefAnchor. To access the application form you must log out of your ATMC MS Teams account and login to your Federation University account using your Federation University email and password.  
  • Victorian government offers up to $1,100 for students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Register your interest.
  • The Victorian Government’s Working for Victoria program helps people who have lost their jobs due to the economic impacts of coronavirus (COVID-19) find new work opportunities.

Update 27 April 2020

Update 9 April 2020

  • Australian Government introduces new visa option – the COVID-19 Pandemic event visa, available under subclass 408.
  • The purpose of the new visa option is to provide a pathway for certain former and current holders of temporary visas to lawfully remain in Australia and to also address the workforce shortages in critical areas like agriculture, aged care and public health during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • This visa will allow applicants to remain in Australia if they have no other visa options and are unable to depart due to travel restrictions.
  • The Department of Home Affairs (DoHA) has stated ‘the COVID-19 Pandemic event visa is only available to people who are onshore and have 28 days or less remaining on their current visa or where their last substantive visa has expired up to 28 days previously.’
  • There is no charge for this visa, it’s free. More information here and here.

Update 5 April 2020

  • Students who have been here longer than 12 months who find themselves in financial hardship will be able to access their Australian superannuation. Apply at the myGov website from April 20.
  • International students are able to work up to 40 hours per fortnight.
  • International students working in aged care and as nurses have had these hours extended to support these critical sectors.
  • International students working in the major supermarkets had also had these hours extended to help get stock on shelves during the high demand. From 1 May, these hours will return to the maximum 40 hours a fortnight as more Australians are being recruited into these roles.
  • Students are encouraged to rely on family support, part-time work where available and their own savings to sustain themselves in Australia.

Update 30 March 2020

  • Library services are available for students who need assistance. Please read the FAQ on how to access this service.
  • Online courses for Federation University Students commenced today. If you are having issuess accessing Microsoft Teams please download the student user guide or lodge a ticket with our help desk for assistance. https://ithelpdesk.atmc.edu.au/open.php.
  • USC courses commence Monday 6 April. Students will receive an email shortly about accessing the online portal to join their virtual classrooms.
  • ATMC will arrange counselling for any student who is feeling anxious or depressed. Please read the Health FAQ for information on accessing this service.
  • Government requires all evictions be put on hold for six months across all states and territories.
  • Public gatherings, excluding household members, have been reduced to a maximum of two people.
  • Students should stay home unless you are: shopping for essentials, receiving medical care, exercising or travelling to work.

Update 27 March 2020

  • Given the recent updates to self-distancing requirements, no classes will be delivered on campus until further notice.
  • Online delivery of courses will commence on 30 March, 2020 for Federation University Students.
  • Online delivery of courses will commence on 6 April, 2020 for University of the Sunshine Coast Students.
  • An email will be sent to the University of the Sunshine Coast students next week explaining the pause in class delivery and information on accessing the online learning portal.
  • Campuses are still open to provide support services to students, however we encourage students to engage with us online wherever possible.
  • Professional Year students based in Australia have commenced online tuition and will have 42 virtual classes up and operational across NSW and VIC by Monday.
  • The DHA has advised that Professional Year students who are not currently in Australia will be unable to enrol or continue in the Professional Year Program.
  • Enrolling Federation students were sent an email containing information about accessing user guides and instructional videos for using the online learning portal.
  • All passengers who arrive in Australia after midnight on Saturday will go into mandatory quarantine in hotels for a fortnight. Defence Force personnel will be brought in to support state and territory police in enforcing the mandatory quarantine and the self-isolation rules that apply to people who are already in Australia or who arrive before the Saturday midnight deadline. Source: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-27/forced-coronavirus-quarantine-for-people-returning-to-australia/12095898

Please review our FAQ page for information specific to students on enrolment, inability to enter the country, health concerns, questions around deferring, internships etc. 

 

Update 18 March 2020

As the situation around novel coronavirus COVID-19 continues to evolve, we wanted to update you on the measures ATMC is taking to meet the challenges of this ongoing health issue.

Please be assured that your health and wellbeing is our primary concern. We are monitoring the situation closely and following the advice of the Australian Government, education and health authorities. You should attend classes as normal. We will update you if this advice changes.

ATMC and our University Partners will notify you immediately if there is any move from classroom to online teaching.  Should this happen, rest assured that ATMC is ready to deliver all of our course content online and we have the resources, systems and people in place to support you in that transition.

ATMC does not underestimate the seriousness of this situation or its potential effects on the life of our students, staff and faculty.

Whilst ATMC has always maintained strict hygiene practices, we have increased the frequency of campus cleaning and sanitisation and are using hospital-grade disinfectant on high-touch and high-traffic areas. Cleaning staff are following the latest advice from NSW and VIC Health Departments and are now wearing masks and thicker gloves during cleaning operations.

You will have noticed posters around campus advising you on ways to reduce the risk of contracting Coronavirus COVID-19. Please be sure to follow these steps as a precautionary measure to protect those around you from contracting the virus.

Early symptoms of Coronavirus COVID-19 include fever, coughing, sore throat, fatigue, and shortness of breath. If you develop a fever and are finding it difficult to breath, please seek medical attention or call the COVID-19 24 Hotline on 1800 675 398 for assistance.

We appreciate that you will have questions about the impact of this virus on living, studying and working in Australia. Please check back here regularly for updates.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any concerns or would like more information. We are here to support you, and encourage you to reach out if you need assistance. Email us at info@atmc.edu.au or contact our student support team on +61 4 8880 5001.



Coronavirus FAQ

Coronavirus updates

Advice for ATMC students about coronavirus COVID-19

This page will be updated this page as the coronavirus COVID-19 situation continues to evolve.

Please review our FAQ page for information specific to students on enrolment, inability to enter the country, health concerns, questions around deferring, internships etc. 

If you need assistance please contact us via the channels below. 

ATMC support contact and government advice >

Information for students unable to enter Australia >

Campus information, online course delivery, library services and workshop cancellation >

Your physical health and emotional wellbeing >

Information for Professional Year Students >

Employment and financial updates >

Update 5 August 2020

The Department of Home Affairs is implementing a range of visa changes to support International students.

A help sheet to support students though this process. To view the help sheet, clickhere.

To submit a valid Student visa application eligible for a nil fee, your must provide a completedForm 1545 COVID-19 Impacted Student.

To submit a valid Student visa application eligible for a nil fee, students must submit a completed Form 1545 COVID-19 Impacted Student via Student Support Servicesunder the ‘under the Course Advice and Enrolment Team categoryThis form will then be sent to the University for signature. Once the university has signed the form, this will be sent back to you for lodgement through your ImniAccount.

Students may be inside or outside of Australia when they submit their application.

Refunds are not available for students who have already applied for a student visa and only new applications from eligible students will attract a nil-VAC.

Any questions or queries regarding processing of nil-VAC student visa applications can be directed to student.visa.help.desk@homeaffairs.gov.au

More Information:
https://minister.homeaffairs.gov.au/alantudge/Pages/supporting-international-students-support-australian-jobs.aspx
https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/student-visa

 

Update 2 August 2020

 

  • A state of disaster has been declared in Victoria and Melbourne moves into stage four restrictions from 6pm tonight.
  • New restrictions for workplaces will be announced on Monday.
  • Supermarkets and basic food and beverage retailers will not be affected.
  • Melbourne will be under a curfew from 8pm to 5am every day for the next six weeks.
  • Only one person per household will be allowed to go shopping per day.
  • People cannot travel more than 5km from their house.
  • Exercise is limited to one hour a day and capped at two people.
  • Night Network will be suspended, and public transport services will be reduced during curfew hours.
  • Study at TAFE and uni must be done remotely.
  • Face coverings will continue to be compulsory

 

20 July 2020

International students enrolled with a private education provider or college in Victoria can apply for Stream Two of the International Student Emergency Relief Fund.

https://www.studymelbourne.vic.gov.au/news-updates/international-student-emergency-relief-fund/private-training-providers

 

9 July 2020

Study NSW has partnered with Foodbank NSW & ACT to provide free food hampers* to international students in NSW.
International students can access their hamper by following these steps:
1. Call Food Bank on (02) 9756 3099
2. State that you are an international student and your suburb, then ask for the distribution point closest to you
3. Have your student visa and student card with you when you collect the hamper.

8 July 2020

In line with advice from the Victorian Chief Health Officer, the Victorian Government has announced that metropolitan Melbourne and Mitchell Shire will return to Stage 3 Stay at Home restrictions from 11.59pm on Wednesday 8 July 2020.

This decision was made in response to a significant increase in community transmission of coronavirus (COVID-19) in these areas.

If you live in one of these areas, there will once again only be four reasons to leave home:

  • Shopping for food and supplies
  • Medical care and caregiving
  • Exercise and recreation
  • Study and work – if you can’t do it from home

Update 2 June 2020

Australia’s federal, state and territory governments are gradually easing restrictions around public gatherings, how businesses can operate, and regional travel. Find out more about the National Cabinet’s three-step plan to create a COVIDSafe Australia with new ways of living and working.

ATMC students will continue online learning using Microsoft Teams. Student services and support will still be available, via phone or online (see details above. Please continue to check this webpage, your email and social media regularly for further updates.

Update 29 April 2020

  • Federation University offers tuition fee reliefAnchor. To access the application form you must log out of your ATMC MS Teams account and login to your Federation University account using your Federation University email and password.  
  • Victorian government offers up to $1,100 for students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Register your interest.
  • The Victorian Government’s Working for Victoria program helps people who have lost their jobs due to the economic impacts of coronavirus (COVID-19) find new work opportunities.

Update 27 April 2020

Update 9 April 2020

  • Australian Government introduces new visa option – the COVID-19 Pandemic event visa, available under subclass 408.
  • The purpose of the new visa option is to provide a pathway for certain former and current holders of temporary visas to lawfully remain in Australia and to also address the workforce shortages in critical areas like agriculture, aged care and public health during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • This visa will allow applicants to remain in Australia if they have no other visa options and are unable to depart due to travel restrictions.
  • The Department of Home Affairs (DoHA) has stated ‘the COVID-19 Pandemic event visa is only available to people who are onshore and have 28 days or less remaining on their current visa or where their last substantive visa has expired up to 28 days previously.’
  • There is no charge for this visa, it’s free. More information here and here.

Update 5 April 2020

  • Students who have been here longer than 12 months who find themselves in financial hardship will be able to access their Australian superannuation. Apply at the myGov website from April 20.
  • International students are able to work up to 40 hours per fortnight.
  • International students working in aged care and as nurses have had these hours extended to support these critical sectors.
  • International students working in the major supermarkets had also had these hours extended to help get stock on shelves during the high demand. From 1 May, these hours will return to the maximum 40 hours a fortnight as more Australians are being recruited into these roles.
  • Students are encouraged to rely on family support, part-time work where available and their own savings to sustain themselves in Australia.

Update 30 March 2020

  • Library services are available for students who need assistance. Please read the FAQ on how to access this service.
  • Online courses for Federation University Students commenced today. If you are having issuess accessing Microsoft Teams please download the student user guide or lodge a ticket with our help desk for assistance. https://ithelpdesk.atmc.edu.au/open.php.
  • USC courses commence Monday 6 April. Students will receive an email shortly about accessing the online portal to join their virtual classrooms.
  • ATMC will arrange counselling for any student who is feeling anxious or depressed. Please read the Health FAQ for information on accessing this service.
  • Government requires all evictions be put on hold for six months across all states and territories.
  • Public gatherings, excluding household members, have been reduced to a maximum of two people.
  • Students should stay home unless you are: shopping for essentials, receiving medical care, exercising or travelling to work.

Update 27 March 2020

  • Given the recent updates to self-distancing requirements, no classes will be delivered on campus until further notice.
  • Online delivery of courses will commence on 30 March, 2020 for Federation University Students.
  • Online delivery of courses will commence on 6 April, 2020 for University of the Sunshine Coast Students.
  • An email will be sent to the University of the Sunshine Coast students next week explaining the pause in class delivery and information on accessing the online learning portal.
  • Campuses are still open to provide support services to students, however we encourage students to engage with us online wherever possible.
  • Professional Year students based in Australia have commenced online tuition and will have 42 virtual classes up and operational across NSW and VIC by Monday.
  • The DHA has advised that Professional Year students who are not currently in Australia will be unable to enrol or continue in the Professional Year Program.
  • Enrolling Federation students were sent an email containing information about accessing user guides and instructional videos for using the online learning portal.
  • All passengers who arrive in Australia after midnight on Saturday will go into mandatory quarantine in hotels for a fortnight. Defence Force personnel will be brought in to support state and territory police in enforcing the mandatory quarantine and the self-isolation rules that apply to people who are already in Australia or who arrive before the Saturday midnight deadline. Source: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-27/forced-coronavirus-quarantine-for-people-returning-to-australia/12095898

Please review our FAQ page for information specific to students on enrolment, inability to enter the country, health concerns, questions around deferring, internships etc. 

 

Update 18 March 2020

As the situation around novel coronavirus COVID-19 continues to evolve, we wanted to update you on the measures ATMC is taking to meet the challenges of this ongoing health issue.

Please be assured that your health and wellbeing is our primary concern. We are monitoring the situation closely and following the advice of the Australian Government, education and health authorities. You should attend classes as normal. We will update you if this advice changes.

ATMC and our University Partners will notify you immediately if there is any move from classroom to online teaching.  Should this happen, rest assured that ATMC is ready to deliver all of our course content online and we have the resources, systems and people in place to support you in that transition.

ATMC does not underestimate the seriousness of this situation or its potential effects on the life of our students, staff and faculty.

Whilst ATMC has always maintained strict hygiene practices, we have increased the frequency of campus cleaning and sanitisation and are using hospital-grade disinfectant on high-touch and high-traffic areas. Cleaning staff are following the latest advice from NSW and VIC Health Departments and are now wearing masks and thicker gloves during cleaning operations.

You will have noticed posters around campus advising you on ways to reduce the risk of contracting Coronavirus COVID-19. Please be sure to follow these steps as a precautionary measure to protect those around you from contracting the virus.

Early symptoms of Coronavirus COVID-19 include fever, coughing, sore throat, fatigue, and shortness of breath. If you develop a fever and are finding it difficult to breath, please seek medical attention or call the COVID-19 24 Hotline on 1800 675 398 for assistance.

We appreciate that you will have questions about the impact of this virus on living, studying and working in Australia. Please check back here regularly for updates.

Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any concerns or would like more information. We are here to support you, and encourage you to reach out if you need assistance. Email us at info@atmc.edu.au or contact our student support team on +61 4 8880 5001.



Before You Leave

Before You Leave

Once your Confirmation of Enrolment comes through and you’ve secured your student visa, it’s time to start thinking of some of the practicalities of travelling to Australia, as you are now set to study abroad.

Packing

It’s worth packing a few mementos from home that will give you some comfort when you’re missing your friends and family, but keep in mind that most airlines have a checked baggage restriction of about 20kg (about 44lb).

The type of clothing you should bring with you depends on the part of the country you will be living in, and the time of year you arrive. The Australian summer coincides with the first academic semester in February, which is when most international students arrive. This means that you can probably get by with jeans, t-shirts and light jackets. If you arrive in time for the second academic semester around July, you’ll need to pack some warm jumpers or sweaters, long-sleeved t-shirts and a coat to cope with winter weather. However, Australian winters are mild in comparison to the icy weather you’d encounter in the Northern Hemisphere. Check out www.bom.gov.au for the latest weather information around Australia.

Insurance

Chances are pretty good that your trip will go smoothly and you won’t encounter any problems. Even so, you should plan for the unexpected. Cancelled flights, lost luggage and wallets can end up costing you a lot of time and money, so take out travel insurance before you leave. It won’t guard against bad things happening, but it will protect you against having to cover unexpected costs.

All student visa holders entering Australia must have Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) for the duration of their stay. OSHC will help you pay for any visits to the doctor you may have while in Australia. Go to the Overseas Student Health Cover page for information on what your OSHC will cover.

Money

You should bring enough Australian currency in cash for your first few days, without carry large amounts of cash on you. You should also have easy access to about AU$1500–3,000 in travellers’ cheques (in your name) so that you can start establishing yourself and setting up your new home quickly.
Note that if you are carrying more that AU$10,000, or equivalent currency, you must declare it to Customs officials when you enter Australia.

Short-term accommodation

It’s a good idea to try to organise a permanent place to live before you arrive in Australia. However, you may decide to wait until you arrive to get an idea of distances between your campus and surrounding suburbs, or to inspect private rental accommodation.



Departure & Arrival

Departure & Arrival

You should arrive at least one week before your classes start to allow time for your enrolment and orientation. This will ensure you have a smooth transition to living and studying in your new environment.

Before leaving home

  1. Read about your destination at www.australia.comwww.studyinaustralia.gov.au
    www.melbourne.vic.gov.au
    www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/internationalstudents
    http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/community/community-support/international-students

2. Check passport, visa, medical requirements and airline bookings.

3. Pack carefully for life in a different climate. In addition to appropriate clothing, you should bring specialized medication and household items such as sheets, towels, favorite cookbook or special cooking implements.

4. Have a small amount of Australian currency for initial needs ($100 AUD). There is a currency exchange counter in the Arrivals Hall at Melbourne International Airport.

Customs and immigration on arrival

Before arrival in Melbourne, you will be given a Customs and Quarantine form to complete. Answer each question carefully as fines for violations are very high. Australia has strict regulations to ensure against diseases and pests. Do not bring any parcels into Australia if you do not know the contents. If you have items that must be declared to Customs it is wise to pack them together in easily accessible luggage.

Transport from International Airport

Once you have cleared all incoming passenger checkpoints, you will be welcomed to Australia and directed to the Arrivals Hall. If you need to exchange some money into Australian dollars you will find Currency Exchange booths throughout the airport.

If you have arranged for friends or relatives to meet you, they will be waiting for you in the Arrivals Hall.

Public transport is available at all international airports (see below) and most regional airports. You can generally expect that a taxi service will be available, and you may also find buses and trains.

OVERSEAS STUDENT HEALTH COVER (OSHC)

Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) is compulsory for student visa holders. BUPA is the preferred OSHC Provider for ATMC.
For detailed information, please visit http://www.bupa.com.au

STUDENTS SUPPORTING DEPENDANTS

A student bringing a spouse and/or children to Australia must demonstrate that they have enough money to support them before the Australian Government will issue a visa. It is a condition of the dependant visa that all children between the ages of 5 and 18 must attend school full-time. More information regarding primary and secondary school fees can be found on the websites below.

Primary school fees

https://www.goodschools.com.au/insights/education-updates/surveyreveals-the-cost-of-an-australian-school-education

Secondary school fees

https://www.privateschoolnews.com.au/melbourne-privatesecondary-school-fees

 

STUDENT VISA CONDITIONS

Australian student visa regulations require international students to enroll in the full-time study and to complete their course of study within the minimum course duration. The minimum course duration at CDU, as quoted in this Prospectus, is based on a standard full-time study load of four units per semester for a coursework degree. Students are permitted to study online for no more than 25% of their course but may not be enrolled exclusively in online learning units during any semester of study.

Australian student visa conditions require international students to:

• Maintain full-time attendance
• Maintain satisfactory academic progress
• Notify the University immediately of any changes in address and contact details while in Australia
• Complete their course of study within the period of their student visa

Further information can be found at:

www.immi.gov.au



Living Expenses

Living Expenses

Living expenses in Melbourne and Sydney

Sydney

As a student visa holder, you will be required to have approximately AUD$20,290 per person per year for living expenses, as advised by the Australian Government.  However, the actual cost depends on your individual lifestyle and you should budget for approximately AUD$25,000 per year per adult.  Remember, your living expenses are separate from your tuition fees. To give you some more guidance on current living expenses, here are a few websites which will help you understand today’s market.

https://www.sydneymovingguide.com/the-cost-of-living-in-sydney/

https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-living/in/Sydney

Melbourne

Melbourne is the second most expensive city in Australia, coming in just after

Sydney. However, for students who need to stick to a budget and a lowcost of living, there are plenty of opportunities to save money in the city, particularly when it comes to life’s ‘nonessentials’. Here are a few websites which will help you further understand Melbourne’s living expenses.

https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/melbourne 

https://insiderguides.com.au/cost-of-living-calculator/

In order to further understand the variance of living expenses between cities of AMTC locations, here is a great website to compare expenses between cities in Australia –

https://www.budgetdirect.com.au/interactives/costofliving/compare/melbourne-vs-sydney/

 

 

Annual living costs amounts for students, guardians and accompanying family members

 

On 23 October 2019, the annual living costs amounts for students, guardians and accompanying family members was updated in line with Consumer Price Index (CPI) increases to mitigate the risk of visa holders falling into financial hardship during their stay in Australia.

The following annual living costs and expenses was updated:

  1. for a primary applicant:
    an increase from AUD20,292 to AUD21,041
  2. for a spouse or de facto partner of the primary applicant:
    an increase from AUD7,100 to AUD7,362
  3. for a dependent child:
    an increase from AUD3,040 to AUD3,152
  4. annual school costs:
    an increase from AUD8,000 to AUD8,296
  5. personal annual income if there is no secondary applicant:
    an increase from AUD60,000 to AUD62,222
  6. personal annual income where there is a secondary applicant:
    an increase from AUD 70,000 to AUD72,592

 

Future financial capacity evidence requirement updates will be made on an annual basis in line with the CPI increases, with implementation at the end of each financial year.

Adjustments in the CPI are provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). We expect the next increase will occur after July 2020.



Social Activities

Social Activities

Social Activities

Sydney

Sydney is the largest city in Australia, with a population of just over 5 million. It has beautiful beaches, a unique history, breath taking architecture, diverse wildlife and much more, who wouldn’t want to visit?

With over 650 suburbs that make up the metropolitan area, each one has a ton to offer with all kinds of attractions for tourists and locals alike. For for information and what to do in Sydney here are a few websites which will help you plan out your daily activities.

https://www.sydney.com/things-to-do
https://www.tripadvisor.com.au/Attractions-g255060-Activities-Sydney_New_South_Wales.html

Melbourne

Melbourne is the capital city of Victoria, and Australia’s second-largest city. Focused around a central city, Greater Melbourne’s area of approximately 9900 km² of suburbs spread more than 40 km to the south, 30 km to the east, 20km to the north and sprawl across vast, flat basalt plains to the west. With such a large city at your fingertips, there is an abundance of great opportunities to explore and enjoy. Here are a few websites which can assist you with deciding where to go next.

https://www.thecrazytourist.com/25-best-things-melbourne-australia/
https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/things-to-do



Money

Money

For many international students, arriving in Australia marks the first time they’ve ever lived away from their parents. It can also be the first time that they are responsible for things like paying for rent,  electricity and food.

This kind of responsibility can end up being almost as stressful as your studies. It’s only when you’re out in the world on your own that you realise how many things you have to pay for, and how expensive those little conveniences you take for granted can be. But with a little bit of planning and research, and a lot of self-discipline, you can keep things from getting out of control.

Although international student visa holders are permitted to work up to 20 hours a week during study periods, don’t rely on your wages from part-time work to live on. It can be very difficult to find part-time work—and  even  more  difficult to find well-paid part-time work. You should treat  any income you earn while you’re in Australia as a bonus, not a necessity.

Research before you arrive put yourself on a budget

The best way to avoid falling into financial stress is to come up with—and stick to—a basic budget.  Here are some tips to help you manage your bank balance:

  • Identify those things that  you have to pay for every  week or month  (like rent,  phone bills, gym membership) and see if you can set up an automatic payment from your bank account on the due date. In Australia this is called direct debit, and because it’s automatic you don’t have to worry about getting in trouble for making late payments or standing in line for an hour to make  the payment in person.
  • If you don’t set up direct debits, make  sure you pay your rent and utilities on time. Late payments often  attract additional charges in your next statement.
  • Try to give yourself a budget to ‘live on’ each week,  and stick to it. For example, withdraw $120 at the beginning of the week to cover all your food, transport and entertainment expenses.
  • Be aware of how much  money  you have in your account at all times.
  • Don’t use a credit card. They’re usually more  trouble than they’re worth.  If you absolutely must have one, shop around for the best card for you (interest rates can vary from as low as 5.99% to as high as 24.99%) and try to use it only in emergencies. These emergencies don’t include new  shoes you don’t need, concert tickets or a top-of- the-line mobile phone.
  • If you buy things online, use a debit card (which is like a credit card, only using money  you already have) or BPay (paying through your savings account). It offers you more protection online, and you won’t have to pay interest on the purchase like you would using a credit card.
  • Minimise the  fees your bank charges by only using one of their ATMs, minimising the amount  of withdrawals you make and your use of EFTPOS.
  • Live economically. The choices you make  can make  a big difference to your weekly budget and overall costs of living. For example, you can pick up second-hand furniture and clothes in good condition at places like the Salvation Army or weekend markets.
  • Look in free street press magazines (you can pick them up in places like music stores, cinemas and student refectories) for details of upcoming cheap or free activities, like concerts, art exhibitions, markets, sporting activities and festivals.

Banking and insurance

You will need to open a bank account when you arrive in Australia. There are dozens of banks and credit unions in Australia to choose from, all with slightly different fee and interest rate structures. You can work out which bank is best for you at www.infochoice.com.au  Normal trading hours are 9.30 am to 4.00 pm Monday to Thursday and 9.30 am to 5.00 pm on Friday. Some banks are open on Saturday mornings, but all are closed on Sundays and public holidays. Automatic teller machines (ATMs) are readily available for withdrawals 24 hours a day. Most stores and supermarkets also have Electronic Funds Transfer At Point of Sale (EFTPOS) terminals where you can pay for goods directly from your bank account and make  cash withdrawals.

Once  you’ve decided which bank to use, opening an account should be easy, so long as you have all the required identification and documentation. Each bank and credit union will have different policies about how much  identification you need to provide them with, but generally your passport will be sufficient for your first six weeks in Australia. After this time, you may also need to provide your birth certificate and something that has your current address on it (such as a copy of your tenancy agreement). As an international student, you will also have to show your student visa. If you are under the age of 18, you might also need to show a school photo ID and a letter from your school principal.

When  opening your account, advise your bank of your Tax File Number (see Tax and Superannuation). This will help you avoid higher tax rates on the interest you earn..

Credit Cards

The most commonly accepted credit cards are MasterCard, Visa, Bankcard, American Express and their affiliates. Most businesses accept  credit cards as payment. It is not necessary to carry large amounts of cash with you.

Transferring funds

Money can be transferred to Australia by bank drafts or cheques and telegraphic transfer. Bank drafts from overseas will take a few days to arrive and can take up to 10 working days to clear through an Australian bank. Telegraphic transfers usually take shorter time, but cost more. Cheques take about five working days to clear.

Tipping

Tipping is not customary in Australia and service charges are not added to accounts by hotels and restaurants. At any time, tipping is a matter of choice in recognition of good service. You can tip food and drink waiters up to 10 per cent of the bill for good service. You are not required to tip taxi drivers.

Insurance

As an international student you will already have Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) insurance, but you might also want  to invest in other  types of insurance to protect you. Travel insurance will offer protection if your airline cancels your flight, loses your luggage, or if you are somehow injured on your trip. Contents insurance will cover your valuable items in your home, such as your TV, jewellery, game consoles and furniture.

Third party car insurance is mandatory if you own a car or motorbike. This means that you are insured against damage you might cause to other cars. Comprehensive insurance covers damage to your car as well.



Health and Wellbeing

Health and Wellbeing

Overseas Student Health Cover

Australia has a special system of health cover for international students called Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC). You will need to buy OSHC before you come to Australia to cover you from when you arrive. The Department of Immigration and Citizenship requires you to maintain OSHC for the duration of your time on a student visa in Australia. ATMC has an agreement with a specific OSHC provider BUPA. You can choose to take out OSHC with this provider, or with the Australian OSHC provider of your choice.

Maintaining Good health

Taking care of your physical health will have a positive impact on your mental health and your ability to study. You should aim to include 30 minutes of moderate exercise, five times a week into your lifestyle. This activity will help you manage stress, pick up your mood when you’re feeling down, and give you more energy (although it might not feel that way right before an exercise session). It will also help you maintain a clear head  for study and provide a great  opportunity to catch up with your friends and make new ones.

Regular exercise is also great  for giving you a good night’s sleep. This is important because without a quality rest every night you will lose energy, become more  irritable and find it difficult to concentrate on your studies. After a long period of poor quality sleep, you might also notice that you get sick easier, and you get sad or depressed by things that normally wouldn’t bother  you.

Of course, being a student is a guaranteed way of not getting a good night’s sleep. It can be hard to find enough time to go to your classes, study and still maintain a social life. Usually, sleep is the first thing that students sacrifice when they try to fit everything else in. But there are some things you can do to help regulate your sleep patterns.

  • Try to get out of bed as soon as you wake  up instead of closing your eyes for ‘five more  minutes’. Also try to get up at the same time every day.
  • Do some exercise in the  morning, preferably outside in the fresh air.
  • Don’t nap during the  day. If you do, it’ll probably take  you longer to get to sleep at night.
  • Don’t use the  time when you’re lying in bed at night to think about all your problems. It’ll only make  you more  anxious. Instead, set aside some time during the day for problem-solving.
  • Don’t go to bed too late, and try to go to sleep at the  same time each night. Allow yourself some time, say 30 minutes, before you get into bed to relax and wind down.
  • Don’t study in bed—it’ll train your brain to think of your bed as a place for study, not sleep.
  • Avoid alcohol and cigarettes for a few hours before going to bed.

If you have sleeping problems, talk to a doctor (known as a general practitioner, or GP). They may have some more  tips that will help you get a good night’s rest.

Another factor that impacts on your health is what  you eat. Again, student life sometimes makes eating well difficult. Grabbing a snack on your way from the library to your friend’s house may be convenient, but over time it will do you more  harm than good. Eating well will boost your health and energy, give your body enough fuel to get through the day, and improve your immune system and ability to concentrate.

  • Don’t skip breakfast. It will kick-start your metabolism for the  day and gives you energy.
  • Include lots of fresh fruit and vegetables in your diet. Australia’s diverse climate creates perfect growing conditions for a huge range of produce, and the quality is among the best you will find in the world. Take advantage of it!
  • Drink lots of water throughout the day. Dehydration causes tiredness, headaches, lack of concentration and plenty of other health issues.
  • If you are vegetarian, make  sure you are getting enough essential nutrients in your diet. You can talk to a GP or nutritionist about substitutes for meat and animal byproducts.
  • Enjoy food like take  away or fast food, chips, chocolate, biscuits and soft drink or soda in moderation.

Doctors

If you’re in Australia for more than a semester, chances are that you’ll have to visit a doctor before you leave. You can be confident that Australian doctors are highly skilled and well educated, and you’ll receive excellent care in a clean and sanitary environment.

What kind of medical care to seek

Unlike in many other countries, in Australia you should NEVER seek help from a hospital emergency room (ER) unless you are in a life- threatening situation. Every night of the week, hospital ERs become congested by people who want treatment for a cold or minor flu, headaches and minor injuries. This puts a lot of stress on the doctors and nurses, and puts the lives of people who are in genuine need of their immediate attention in jeopardy.

Specialist Doctors

In some cases you may need to see a specialist doctor,  for example an optician, podiatrist or dermatologist. Generally, you won’t be able to see a specialist without first getting a referral for their services from your GP. Specialist doctors are a lot more  expensive than GPs, but some of their services might be covered under your Overseas Student Health Cover plan. A specialist doctor will assess your condition, sometimes with the aid of tests, and develop a treatment plan for you to follow. You will probably have to see your specialist several times to treat  your medical condition.

Emergency room doctors

Emergency room (ER) doctors work in hospitals and treat patients with severe and life-threatening injuries or illnesses. With any luck, you will never  have to see an ER doctor.  But if you do, they will give you excellent care. Call 000 if you or a friend needs urgent medical attention, you may be advised to go to a hospital, or depending on the circumstances an ambulance will come and pick you up. You will receive medical attention from ambulance staff, or paramedics, on your way to the hospital.

Dentists

The other  kind of doctor you may regularly see in Australia is a dentist. You can find dentists in your area listed in the Yellow Pages. Dentists will generally charge a fee for their service, which can be quite expensive. Your OSHC may cover part of these costs—make sure you read your OSHC policy and know what  kinds of dental procedures you are covered for. Generally you do not need a referral from your GP to see a dentist.

Personal safety

One of the scariest things about moving to a new  country can also be one of the most exciting: anonymity. You probably won’t know too many people when you arrive—if anyone—and this can give you a feeling of freedom  like you’ve never  had. Suddenly, you feel like you have the opportunity to be whoever you want.  Without your family and friends around, you can reinvent yourself and perhaps feel less inhibited about the things that you wouldn’t dare do at home. While this can be one of the most liberating things about studying in a new  place, it’s important that you don’t lose your focus on your personal safety. While Australia is a comparatively safe place to live and has relatively low crime rates, you must still take the necessary precautions to protect yourself—just like you would at home.

Here are a few general tips to help keep you safe.

  • Never  carry large amounts of money  with you. You can access the money  in your bank account at most stores with your ATM card.
  • Make sure you close the  zipper on your bag so that  thieves can’t reach in and take your purse or wallet, mobile phone, iPod, etc.
  • Don’t walk alone at night. Walk in a group and stay in well-lit areas.
  • If you’re going out, plan your trip so that  you know how you’re getting home,  and make  sure you have enough money for transport if you need it.
  • Walk with confidence. Be wary of casual requests from strangers on the street, like someone asking for the time or money  for a bus ticket. While most people will be genuine in their request, others might have ulterior motives.

When using an ATM, prevent others from seeing your PIN number and secure your cash quickly in your bag. Don’t count your money on the street.

  • Don’t let someone you don’t know drive you home.  If you are the driver, don’t offer a lift to people who are unknown  to you.
  • Make sure your mobile phone always has enough battery power, or that you have change for a pay phone if you need to call for help. However, 000 emergency calls are free from any phone.
  • If you’re listening to your iPod on the  street, don’t turn it up so loud that you can’t hear trouble approaching, either from other people or from cars, trams and buses when you’re crossing the street.
  • Always cross the  street at pedestrian crossings (also known as a zebra crossing) or at traffic lights with pedestrian signals. Drivers in Australia generally don’t expect to have to yield for pedestrians in traffic.